Students in A ED 490: Capstone Course in Art Education will create e-portfolios and publish them on CDs and/or online, write a teaching philosophy statement that outlines a curricular orientation, practice job interviews, select and participate in a professional development activity and report on it, and present a selected learning project.

Grading Policy:

In order to earn an A in this class all assignments must be completed and on time. In addition, the rubrics for each assignment listed below provides guidance on expectations for A work. By adding the points for the 5 assignments that you earn you can determine your grade in that if they equal 93 or above you receive an A, 90-92 an A-, 87-89 B+, 83-86 B, 80-82 B-, 77-79 C+, 73-76 C, 70-72 C-, 62-69 D, below 62 a no pass.


Assignments and Evaluation Criteria and Rubrics
  C grade
B grade A grade
10% Participation in Class Discussion

Listens without comment.

(below 6 is given for not attending to class)

Listens to others and provides comments and feedback on what peers present. Listens to others and provides comments and feedback on what peers present, as well as initiates discussion related to teaching art.
Novice (7.5) Proficient (8.5) Excellent (10)
10% Professional Development Turned in plan by 9/30 and presented on professional development resource on either 11/4 or 11/11. Turned in plan by 9/30, met with professor outside of class to discuss plan, and presented on professional development resource. Turned in plan by 9/30, met with professor outside of class to discuss plan, and presented on YOUR involvement in the professional development resource.
Novice (7.5) Proficient (8.5) Excellent (10)
20% Selected Learning Turned in plan by 9/30 and presented YOUR area of selected learning on either 12/2 or 12/9. Plan demonstrated reflection on one's learning, and one's strong and weak areas needed to become an art teacher. Rubrics with plan demonstrated understanding of this assessment strategy. Presentation showed evidence of learning. Reflective plan with self-assessment rubrics were discussed with professor and showed motivation to learn. Professional presentation showed evidence of learning and an exploration into different views on the topic. The format of the presentation enhanced understanding of the content for peers.
Novice (15) Proficient (17) Excellent (20)
10% Job Interview Prepared to present YOUR portfolio in a professional manner and respond to interview questions on 11/18 & 11/25. Role-played an employer and presented YOUR portfolio in a professional manner responding to questions with succintness and examples.  Prepared to role-play employer by investigating jobs placements, various curricular foci for art in actual schools, and to present YOUR portfolio in a professional manner responding to questions with succintness and examples. 
Novice (7.5) Proficient (8.5) Excellent (10)

50% Professional Portfolio Criteria:

  • includes a creative cover page; table of contents; an introduction section with a one or two-page autobiography with focus on becoming an artist/art educator, a one to two-page resume, a list of courses you have taken, and one or two-page philosophy statements about beliefs about teaching, art, and learners; and include quality evidence in such forms as an edited video, sample lessons, units of study, and work samples from field experiences and other coursework correlated to specified goals along with reflection statements on why the evidence was selected and what strengths it represents.
  • professionalism
  • design, usability, navigation
By 12/15 prepared a teaching and learning portfolio with most sections included listed in the criteria for the project and turned it in on a CD (an additional notebook hardcopy portfolio is optional) or sent a note via email with the URL. Submitted drafts of portfolio sections on 9/30 and 10/14 and incorporated feedback in the final portfolio.

Your portfolio is complete (see criteria for contents) by 12/15 and provides a comprehensive and professional presentation of your education, experience, and strengths.

The navigation is clear and easy to use.

Submitted drafts of portfolio sections on 9/30 and 10/14 and incorporated feedback in the final portfolio.

Your portfolio is complete (see criteria for contents) by 12/15 and provides a comprehensive and professional presentation of your education, experience, and strengths that includes reflections on selected evidence of learning in relation to the threads in the art education program and INTASC principles as indicators of art teacher expectations, as well as your individual goals.

The design is inviting and engaging. The navigation allows clear access to all sections.

Novice (39) Proficient (44)

Excellent (50)

Writing guidelines and evaluation criteria:
 

Written asignments should be prepared on a computer. Use word-processing features to put page numbers on each page. Design with appropriate spacing (e.g., one-inch margins between text and edge of page). Proofread at least once on the computer since word-processing software identifies spelling (red underline) and grammatical errors (green underline), and at least once reading the hardcopy. The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA Manual), 5th edition, is the most commonly used style manual in art education publications so I ask that you use APA. A handout will be provided for guidelines on preparing professional resumes. Links on the course calendar also provide guidance and examples for the written sections of your portfolio.

FORMAT STYLE: Used APA (5th edition) style and citation format—including citing on-line sources and online images.

Cite the Source. Here are some basics:

• if paraphrased then (author's last name, year published)
• if 3 or more consecutive words or an image quoted directly (author's last name, year published, p. #).
• If from more than one page (author, year, pp. #).
• If there is no date or no page number (n.d.) (put the URL as the page number)
• If 40 words or more use a block quote format in which the quote is indented as a block lined-up with the paragraph indent. (author, year, p. #)
• Then full reference at the end of the paper (see examples below):

References
Ewing, L. (2000). Art in the dark: A nonvisual learners' curriculum. In D. E. Fehr, K. Fehr, & K. Keifer-Boyd (Eds.), Real-world readings in art education: Things your professors never told you (pp. 83-89). New York: Falmer Press.

Lovejoy, M. (1997). Postmodern currents: Art and artists in the age of electronic media (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

New Horizons for Learning (2001). Inclusive learning environments for students with special needs [On-line]. Available: http://www.newhorizons.org/spneeds_intr.html

Stryker, B., & Brooks, S. (1999). DissemiNET [On-line artwork]. Available: http://disseminet.walkerart.org

Walton, K. L. (1970). Categories of art. The Philosophical Review, 79, 334-367.

Click here for further information on citing others' work used in your work.)

Figure Captions: If an image is placed with your paper, then refer to "See Figure #" in the body of the paper. Insert image, use image layout to format (e.g., center or text wrap), add figure capture under image (e.g., Figure 1: Home page of Nam June Paik's Web Site, author, year). In the reference section at the end of your paper list the full citation.