Exquisite Engendering Remix

EXHIBITION Opens February 22, 2018

Open to all ages, indefinitely.
Click “comment” under each artwork to speak or write your comments.

 

Curators from Penn State's Master of Professional Studies course, A ED 811: New Media & Pedagogy
taught by Dr. Karen Keifer-Boyd, Professor of Art Education and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Curators: Lance Rautzhan, Kerry Royer, Ellie Voyvodich, Megan Whitney

Exhibition posters are linked here.

Remixes are artworks that provide new twists or perspectives on the original material(s). Remixes often use everyday imagery, audio, and/or video from popular culture. Sampling, visual quoting, and parody are elements of remix aesthetics. Although cultural fragments are decontextualized, the juxtaposition of image and audio creates a cultural critique of prevalent and dominant cultural narratives. The 2016 Remix Exhibition is linked here.

We invite your comments by selecting a Find prompt below to guide your search in the curated exhibitions on this page.

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FIND in the Video Art

1. Find a video or section of a video that symbolically represents the USA. How does this reflect diversity and social justice issues in relation to the video’s narrative?

2. FIND WHERE OCEANS MEET – WHAT DOES IT MEAN WHEN TITANS CLASH?

3. FIND POLITICAL RHETORIC – WHAT IS THE TREATMENT OF A SPORTS FIGURE WHO TAKES AN INDIVIDUAL STANCE OPPOSED TO TEAM UNITY?

4. FIND A FAMILY CONNECTION – HOW IS GENDER BIAS IN SPORTS MASQUERADED?

5. FIND A MAN ON A BUS – WHEN CROWDS BECOME MOBS, HOW DOES AN INDIVIDUAL REACT?

6. FIND A SERIES OF LAUGHABLE SCENES – HOW DOES THE INANE COMPARE WHEN SIZED UP NEXT TO DISPARITY?

7. Find a story or idea with which you connect. How do you find yourself in relation to this narrative? How has it internalized itself in your life?

8. Find a story or idea you disagree with or causes unease. How did you come to disagree with this? How would you redefine it?

9. Find a video from the exhibition that connects to a personal memory of yours. How does the video remind and relate to you.

10. Find a video about a societal pressure or message that speaks to you. Has this pressure positively or negatively affected your life? Do you want your children or young people you know to receive the same message? Why or why not?

11. Find the voice or image of a woman. How is she portrayed? Explain whether it is accurate from your perspective.

12. Find a video that shows an opposite.
How does seeing the opposites together change your perspective of the video?

13. Find a video that includes clips from another period in time. What does it show you about where we are in time now? In what ways does it conflict with or compliment the other video clips?

14. Find a video that you agree with
What part of the video do you agree with and why?

15. Find a video that includes a machine
What is the purpose of the machine and how is that important to the message of the video? Do you think that this machine adds or subtracts from the quality of life? Why?

16. Find a video with a person who is speaking. In what way does this audio track support the message of the video? If you take the audio away from the visual, does it have the same impact? If not, how is it different?

Whitewash

The United States of America today is as diverse as ever and also as divided as ever. For those born outside the hegemonic power structures of White privilege in the USA, it is easy to see the heavy imbalance in today’s society. Being White, and especially male and White, is an advantage in most situations. Those who fall into the non-White category struggle daily with perceptions and stereotypes. Those who are White, tend to be oblivious by circumstance to the oppression of others. White people discussing White privilege borders on taboo. It is a discussion few will engage. The three artists presented in Whitewash, through different approaches to re-mix video, reach across the divide in order to open dialogue and uncover the whitewashing of social justice and diversity issues in contemporary U.S. society.

~ Lance Rautzhan

 

Football and Culture

PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL. IS IT ENTERTAINMENT? A BUSINESS? A CULTURAL INDICATOR? IN THIS VIDEO REMIX SERIES, CURATED BY KERRY ROYER, EXPLORE THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF POLITICIZING A MASSIVE ANCHOR OF AMERICAN IDEOLOGY. VIEW HOW ADVERTISING REFLECTS VALUES. FOCUS ON SPORTS AND GENDER BIAS. WATCH THE RIOTOUS OUTCOME OF WINNING, LOSING AND TAKING A KNEE.

~ Kerry Royer

  Internalize Redefine

The ideas presented by Kerry Royer's "Water," Zena Kirby's "The Evolution of Marketable Feminine Objectification," and my "Adolescent Self-Judgement" may seem disconnected, but they are not. All three interrogate society's internalized virtues that have strayed far from what the creators believe should be our redefined reality. On water, we question corporate monetary choices in contrast to human morality and global sustainability. On objectification, we measure the distance society traveled to make money with the female form. On adolescence, we want to highlight how imperfect society has pressured our children to feel. It's time for society to redefine how we treat people. 

~ Ellie Voyvodich
 

Exposing Advertising

The three videos included in this exhibition are a collection of remixes that expose the hidden agendas of commercial advertising. Each video demonstrates a different perspective of the world, from the eyes of women, artists and even machines. These three artists beg you to think and see that we are not only being sold cars, T-shirts or toys but we are being sold a version of corporate America’s identity. Through the use of text in Rebecca Pannitch’s “Remix- AED 811” to the use of opposing narration in Liz Johnson’s “75 Second Remix” these videos all point to our society forgetting the important of working with our hands, the importance of art and most of all the importance of being an individual.

~ Megan Whitney