ART EDUCATION participation

PRECURSORS

GAMING TECHNOLOGY

FEMINIST PEDAGOGY

COLLABORATIVE ART

CYBERFEMINIST ARTISTS

FEMINIST PEDAGOGY:

Can feminist pedagogy be enacted in a web-based arts learning environment? And, if so, how?

My work on CyberFeminist House began with research on what feminist define as feminist pedagogy for the creation of spaces as an aesthetic-expressive forum to disrupt patriarchal inscriptions and structures. Judy Chicago & Mariam Shapiro facilitation Womanhouse (1971), which serves as a foundation for which feminist art pedagogy developed. Internationally renowned artist, Judy Chicago further developed her feminist pedagogy in another house project, the At Home project, in Kentucky (2001-2002). In 2002, I interviewed the At Home participants concerning the nature of the collaboration and their understanding of feminist pedagogy experienced in the At Home project, and interviewed Judy Chicago on November 23, 2002, and others involved with Womanhouse. From this research and my own teaching practices I have worked to develop and articulare feminist cyberpedagogy.

In f all 2003, I created a multimedia Web site from research on Judy Chicago’s teaching methodology to provide a model for art educators on a Participatory Art Pedagogy Informed by Feminist Principles. The Web site at http://www.throughtheflower.org/pedagogy/ also premiered at three exhibition sites in Pomona and Claremont galleries in California on January 9 and 10, 2004, and was a part of the two-month Envisioning the Future exhibition. I have used this multimedia site on pedagogy to facilitate collaborative artworks in her courses.

Specific teaching approaches built into the CFH program are:

• Norms questioned
• Self-representation questioned
• Difference valued
• Local needs valued
• Accountability stressed
Perpetual displacement strategies employed

In 2005, a graduate student wrote to me that "no young working woman today wants to label herself as a 'feminist' even though she might fit the bill." If interested in discussing this issue please comment the National Art Education Women's Caucus FaceBook group. Such a discussion might consider who has created negative connotations of the word feminism, and for what purposes (i.e., a question of how knowledge and identities are constructed)? What are the connotations? How true are those connotations to what you believe feminism means? What identity would you be constructing by calling yourself a feminist? What are the consequences of defining oneself as a feminist?